I have been in love with Yinka Shonibare MBE since 2008. Over the past decade, Shonibare has become well known for his exploration of colonialism and post-colonialism within the contemporary context of globalization  The artist recurrent use of Dutch wax in the most unconventional ways is one of the features that strokes the most. 19th century Dutch wax print, commonly known as ‘African fabric’ is charged with both colonialist history, cultural appropriation, and migration experiences. Colonial powers, particularly the Dutch and the English, played heavy roles in industrializing the batik production techniques and popularizing the resulting textiles in foreign markets. By evoking the Dutch Wax print’s socio-political history of production Shonibare exposes past and current relationship between Europe and African.  His sculpture become symbolic of the undeniable hybridity within one’s cultural inheritance. Mixing Western art history reference and literature, he revisits the foundations of our collective contemporary identity. 

1- THE SWING (AFTER FRAGONARD)

Mixed media, 330 X 350 X 220 cm

©2001, Yinka Shonibare, MBE

2-HOW TO BLOW-UP TWO HEADS AT ONCE

Two mannequins, two guns, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, shoes, leather riding boots, plinth 93 1/2 X 63 X 48 inches

©2006, Yinka Shonibare, MBE

3-SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA

14 life-size mannequins, 14 chairs, table, Dutch wax printed cotton, 132 X 488 X 280 cm

©2003, Yinka Shonibare, MBE

4- GALLANTRY AND CRIMINAL CONVERSATION

11 life-size mannequins, metal and wood cases, Dutch wax printed cotton, leather, wood, steel (dimenions variable)

©2002, Yinka Shonibare, MBE

 

 

http://www.yinkashonibarembe.com